Middle Harbor Shoreline Park Oakland (1 of 28) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
Middel_Harbor_Shoreline_Park_20100314_150618_3413BCX.jpg
Middle Harbor Shoreline Park Oakland (1 of 28) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
Port of Oakland (260 views)
Middle Harbor Shoreline Park
Operated by: East bay Regional Park District

7th St. at Middle Harbor Road, Oakland, California

(Photo posted Friday 28 May 2010)

(Photo taken 15:06:18 Sunday 14 March 2010)

© 2010 Bryan Costales
  Creative Commons License comment

The park was surrounded by the Port of Oakland Marine Terminals. Access was along 7th Street (at the intersection) then a short way out Middle Harbor road to the entrance. The park was newly opened in 2004. Note the total lack of a sidewalk on the park side of the road.

Related Stories: Port View
Entry to the park (359 views)
by Bryan Costales
(2 of 28) Entry to the park is a drive past a bit of nautical art and access to vast parking lots. The signs read: No Dogs No Alcoholic Beverages
Entry gate closed (411 views)
by Bryan Costales
(3 of 28) A sign inside the park states that the driveway entry gate is closed from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. Note that the park graciously allows walk in access when the park is open. Unfortunately the park
by Bryan Costales
(4 of 28) The park was built on land formerly occupied by the Oakland Naval Supply Depot. A printed guide near the entrance explained how building 122 (left photo) dominated the location before it became a
by Bryan Costales
(5 of 28) That large warehouse that dominated the site, was remembered by the zig-zag seating that outlined the former edge of building 122.
Grassy interior (416 views)
by Bryan Costales
(6 of 28) The interior of building 122 had become a grassy field upon with folks could play ball. Note that the Oakland side of the Bay Bridge could be seen just beyond the park.
Stone art (345 views)
by Bryan Costales
(7 of 28) In the interior of the park was a non-running fountain decorated with stone art. Ceramic art squares produced by school children were at the left. This oasis was surrounded by few benches.
Saw-tooth roof (625 views)
by Bryan Costales
(8 of 28) Barbecues were available for use along with picnic tables. They were arranged in a long row under a saw-tooth roof. The saw-tooth roof was in the same location and at the height as the original roof
Central walkway (367 views)
by Bryan Costales
(9 of 28) From the parking lots, a path ran down the center of the park leading to a vast viewing area. Across the bay from this park was San Francisco.
by Bryan Costales
(10 of 28) Middle Harbor itself as it looked during low tide. Note the buoys appear to set aside a swimming area, but signs were also present that prohibited swimming.
Old rail line (407 views)
by Bryan Costales
(11 of 28) The former rail line that serviced building 122 and the other buildings that used to occupy this area. This wide plaza was part of the Bay Trail and led at its far end, left around to Port View
by Bryan Costales
(12 of 28) Three binocular telescopes were available in the viewing area. Two tall ones for use by people standing and one lower one on an offset arm for children and people in wheelchairs.
Viewing tower (347 views)
by Bryan Costales
(13 of 28) Near the southern end stood the Observation Tower. It was available to view the workings of the Port of Oakland, or to view the wildlife in the wetlands below it. The Observation Tower was about 1/4
Statue on shore (358 views)
by Terry Costales
(14 of 28) One the shore near the beach was a statue of a seal.
A kite (366 views)
by Terry Costales
(15 of 28) This park was a good place to fly kites because of the reliable on-shore breeze from the Pacific Ocean.
Observation Tower (383 views)
by Terry Costales
(16 of 28) A girl, as part of exercise, ran across the Observation Tower. The tower was accessible using stairs, but lacked an elevator so barred access to the elderly and disabled.
by Terry Costales
(17 of 28) A telephoto view from the park of the Bay Bridge in the far distance, shipping containers in the near distance, and masses of birds in the foreground.
Trash in mud (342 views)
by Bryan Costales
(18 of 28) One reason to stay out of the mud in Middle Harbor was the trash there.
Deep soft mud (389 views)
by Bryan Costales
(19 of 28) Two signs outlined the rules for use of the beach. The signs read: No swimming or wading Warning: Deep soft mud
by Bryan Costales
(20 of 28) A line of palm trees parallel the beach. Seating and picnic tables were scattered between the trees.
A bench (385 views)
by Bryan Costales
(21 of 28) A bench between two berms had a clear view that afternoon of Middle Harbor, the Coast Range across the bay, and of kites flown.
by Bryan Costales
(22 of 28) The back side of the line of palms. A walkway with the occasional picnic table. Note the sea gulls and cranes.
by Bryan Costales
(23 of 28) Bollards were lined up down the center of the main path into and out of the park. They were purely decorative because no big ship could possibly tie up here.
by Bryan Costales
(24 of 28) The restrooms appeared clean and new, but were closed on weekends. Beware that the closest "open" restrooms were a half mile away in Port View Park (but they were closed that weekend too). Shouldn't
Curved seating (375 views)
by Bryan Costales
(25 of 28) A curved seating area lay just off the central pathway parallel to the beach and parallel to the line of palms.
by Bryan Costales
(26 of 28) Overview of the park shot from its south east corner. The beach was to the left. The saw-tooth roof was at the far end. Unseen beyond the path at the left was building 122 (now a grassy ball park).
No oily items (339 views)
by Bryan Costales
(27 of 28) On a few of the garbage cans nearest the parking lot were signs that read: Attention Please do not place oily items in trash Did this imply that in Oakland one would expect people to work on their
The 13 bus (358 views)
by Bryan Costales
(28 of 28) There was a bus stop for the AC Transit 13 bus line at the park. But AC Transit recently discontinued the 13 line. The stop is still there, but a bus will never arrive. That means the only way to