Photofictional for April 10, 2008 (8 of 341) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
BP20080410.jpg
Photofictional for April 10, 2008 (8 of 341) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
Dimly lit stairway down into an unknown place (502 views)
Photo Posted Thursday, April 10, 2008
(2008) Karlsruhe, Germany

© 2008 Bryan Costales
Creative Commons License

When Donna Fitzright died, she felt herself sputter and float. Barely aware, she flitted like a moth who was also the flame. A bright light loomed ahead of her and she wiggled slowly toward it.

The light was an incandescent bulb in a dim stairway leading down. Donna followed the light. Down, she thought, down down down into purgatory. But in actual fact, she hovered.

Mrs. Phitzrather brought her daughter home from recital. They descended the stairs into their basement home.

"Look," her daughter said. "A moth."

"Yes. They're drawn to lights thinking the lights are flames."

"My science book said they think lights are the sun."

"Whatever," said mom. "Turn off the light for me will you when we go in."

"Okay."

Donna was plunged into darkness. This is Hell, she thought. She felt warmth and moved toward it. Too hot. She moved back. She felt warmth and moved toward it. Too hot. She moved back. This went on for an eternity.

Eventually the world became light. The ghost that was Donna fluttered up and out of the stairway and found the sun. Up she fluttered, higher and higher. Ever upward she flew, always towards, but never into the sun.

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