Animalblog for June 22, 2010 (161 of 189) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
20100622_Male_House_Finch_Is_Colorful.jpg
Animalblog for June 22, 2010 (161 of 189) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) (581 views)
Lake Merced, Harding Park internal link San Francisco, California
(Photo posted Tuesday 22 June, 2010)

(Photo taken 12:17:54 Sunday 28 March, 2010)

© 2010 Terry Costales
Creative Commons License

A very common bird but one I've rarely photographed. The red color of this house finch indicated he was male. The female, by contrast, is quite plain with no coloration. external link

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by Terry Costales
(162 of 189) This is a close-up of the same Pelican I posted yesterday,
Fern (676 views)
by Terry Costales
(163 of 189) This was neither a talon nor a mutated squid tentacle. It was the just the frond of a fern about to unroll. The actual plant was at least seven feet tall.
by Terry Costales
(164 of 189) The Harbor Seal was very curious about us as we motored past, but not curious enough to actually move.
by Terry Costales
(165 of 189) A mallard duckling observes Mom's dabbling technique.
by Terry Costales
(166 of 189) This bedraggled juvenile black-crowned night heron was perched on the dock near the boat we were going to use. I hoped it wasn't a harbinger of how our trip would turn out.
by Terry Costales
(167 of 189) A close-up of the lovely coot.
by Terry Costales
(168 of 189) Prehistoric looking pelicans sun and preen in the winter sun.
by Terry Costales
(169 of 189) I was able to get nice close-ups of the harbor seals because I used a telephoto lens. If the boat had come this close they would have been disturbed and swum away.
by Terry Costales
(170 of 189) Sea Otters appeared to spend a great deal of their time grooming themselves. They use their bodies as tables, so have to keep food scraps washed off. While they clean, they also push and sometimes
Forster Tern (529 views)
by Terry Costales
(171 of 189) It was satisfying to get a close-up of this wonderful diving bird.
by Terry Costales
(172 of 189) A large group of pelicans were perched on the fish processing equipment.
by Terry Costales
(173 of 189) There are hundreds of sea lions on Anacapa Island. This group was on the side of the island that faced the mainland, but the majority of them were on the other side facing the sea, which we did see
by Terry Costales
(174 of 189) No, that's not its trunk. It's the tail of an Asian Elephant.
by Terry Costales
(175 of 189) I love the pattern of this seal's fur, but I would never entertain the idea of taking it away from her to use for myself.
by Terry Costales
(176 of 189) This photo shows a sea lion swimming in the late afternoon sunlight beneath the wharf in Santa Cruz. Lovely light on a lovely animal.
by Terry Costales
(177 of 189) The rocks surrounding Anacapa Island are dramatic and favored by pelicans.
by Terry Costales
(178 of 189) The King contemplated freedom.
by Terry Costales
(179 of 189) Here is a mallard hen with her one chick.
by Terry Costales
(180 of 189) We saw many of these Marbled Godwits that day on the slough. This one is just about to take flight.
by Terry Costales
(181 of 189) The typical Towhee is very shy and will scuttle away as soon as anyone approaches. This Towhee however, allowed me to get quite close and seemed unpreturbed by me or other visitors to the park.
by Terry Costales
(182 of 189) Lemurs are one of my favorite mammals. Every house in heaven should have one.
by Terry Costales
(183 of 189) I grew up to know this bird as the Oregon Junco with it's rufous flanks and black hood. Then I later learned it is really a Dark-eyed Junco and the Oregon Junco is a subspecies. This species of
by Terry Costales
(184 of 189) I saw many lizards that day. This one was recharging his "solar batteries". When I was a kid we called this type of lizard a blue-belly.
by Terry Costales
(185 of 189) The lion demonstrated camouflage.
by Terry Costales
(186 of 189) A female sea lion tried to appear very demure.
by Terry Costales
(187 of 189) After "evicting" us from its part of the park, the jay watched and made sure we were actually leaving.
by Terry Costales
(188 of 189) Pelicans roosting near the Anacapa lighthouse.
by Terry Costales
(189 of 189) This tiny bird was poking around the holes in a dead tree. It was far away but I did manage to get a couple of shots.
by Terry Costales
(1 of 189) Here is another otter grooming or maybe he is thinking "oh, not another boatload of paparazzi!"
by Terry Costales
(2 of 189) The Eared Grebe is a very small bird compared to the Western and Clark's Grebes. Only 13 inches long compared to the other bird's 25 inches. I hope to photograph one in breeding plumage someday
by Terry Costales
(3 of 189) This Pacific-slope Flycatcher sat on its thorny branch and let me approach to within a few feet. It was perched in the trees surrounding the now closed Pony Rides at Tilden Park.
by Terry Costales
(4 of 189) King of the mountain and he knows it.
by Terry Costales
(5 of 189) A great egret at the edge of the bay looking for food. It is a very graceful bird whether walking or flying.
by Terry Costales
(6 of 189) Across the slough and in the tops of a grove of distant trees was a colony of nesting Great Blue Herons. Four adult herons and many more nests were visible.
by Terry Costales
(7 of 189) This cormorant appeared to swim in green water but the green was actually a reflection of trees.
by Terry Costales
(8 of 189) Natural Bridges Park was sunny and bright that day, which brought out the colors of the birds and water. In contrast, he following day was overcast with afternoon rain.
by Terry Costales
(9 of 189) Pretty butterflies are often the food for pretty birds.
by Terry Costales
(10 of 189) A Scrub Jay on a barbecue searched for food.
by Terry Costales
(11 of 189) The pelican glides effortlessly over the surface of the sea.
by Terry Costales
(12 of 189) The otter balanced his "plate" on his stomach while enjoying that last little morsel.
by Terry Costales
(13 of 189) A song sparrow found a place to drink.
by Terry Costales
(14 of 189) A very young sea lion was sleepily curious about his observers.
David Graves (749 views)
by Terry Costales
(15 of 189) My dashing brother manned the wheel of the Tourmalina. However, he is a man of many talents and helped out in other ways as well.
by Terry Costales
(16 of 189) This cockatoo seemed healthy and alert but very quiet.
by Terry Costales
(17 of 189) Here is the escaped flamingo of Elkhorn Slough. I realize it's the look of this species of flamingo, but doesn't this guy appear as if he's totally fed up with his job and can't take it anymore?
by Terry Costales
(18 of 189) This photo of whimbrels shows their head markings quite well.
by Terry Costales
(19 of 189) The fisherman hadn't noticed that a pelican had just landed next to him on the pier.
by Terry Costales
(20 of 189) A tiny charmer with a beakful of lunch.
Capped Heron (790 views)
by Terry Costales
(21 of 189) A typical view of the jungle's edge as seen from the boat as we motored past.
by Terry Costales
(22 of 189) A Western Grebe after its dive for fish.
by Terry Costales
(23 of 189) Pelican posed aboard an old fishing boat.
by Terry Costales
(24 of 189) This wall of pelicans was only a small sampling of the hundreds on the island.
by Terry Costales
(25 of 189) Usually, a spotted towhee is seen in the underbrush. In the spring however, the male spends a great deal of time in the trees singing to attract a mate.
Macaws (679 views)
by Terry Costales
(26 of 189) Two Macaws preening one another. A very intimate, gentle moment in a birds' life.
by Terry Costales
(27 of 189) This photo shows just part of a very large raft of otters we saw in the Elkhorn Slough. The older individuals had light faces, and such cute faces they were.
by Terry Costales
(28 of 189) Imagine a charcoal colored bird that landed in a birdbath filled with indigo-blue Easter Egg dye. That's the Stellar's Jay. But in bright sunlight, the normally charcoal top of the Stellar's Jay
by Terry Costales
(29 of 189) A female Anna's Hummingbird sat quite still on a dried twig. For a moment.
by Terry Costales
(30 of 189) The same type of lizard I saw on Sherman Island was found in Tilden Park.
Killdeer eggs (844 views)
by Terry Costales
(31 of 189) This was the second killdeer nest I'd found. The first one was on gravel and this one on flowerbed mulch. Both times the nests were easily overlooked and the eggs hard to spot.
by Terry Costales
(32 of 189) This Stellar's Jay held down a butterfly and pulled off it's wing's. Naughty bird.
by Terry Costales
(33 of 189) The Spectacled Bear is the only bear that comes from South America. I hope this unique and beautiful endangered bear survives.
by Terry Costales
(34 of 189) A male Brewer's blackbird was showing off its glorious purple sheen.
by Terry Costales
(35 of 189) Seeing a large colony of sea lions in the wild is very different than seeing them in a manmade setting like Pier 39.
by Terry Costales
(36 of 189) To our left as we exited the harbor and entered the slough, we saw an old pier covered with sea lions. We slowly motored past them. It was quite satisfying to be at their level and so close to them.
by Terry Costales
(37 of 189) The sandpipers illustrate the adage that "birds of a feather flock together" and the whimbrel shows that, yes, we all can just get along.
by Terry Costales
(38 of 189) A very pregnant Harbor Seal looking quite pleased with herself.
by Terry Costales
(39 of 189) The arboretum gardeners really knew what they were doing. These Swan River Daisies were bloomed in wild profusion.
Sparrow (620 views)
by Terry Costales
(40 of 189) A sparrow on a bare November day.
by Terry Costales
(41 of 189) The white markings on the tail of a female Oregon Junco are only visible in flight. Or, in this case, just before take-off.
by Terry Costales
(42 of 189) A female avocet sits on her eggs. When the tide comes in this nest will barely be above the water.
by Terry Costales
(43 of 189) A Great Blue Heron waded in shallow water in search of food.
by Terry Costales
(44 of 189) A male American Goldfinch coming into breeding plumage.
by Terry Costales
(45 of 189) This silhouette clearly shows the double crests that gave this cormorant its name.
by Terry Costales
(46 of 189) The Green-winged Macaw goes by many names: Greenwing Macaw, Red and Green Macaw and Green Wing Macaw. They are one of the largest and gentlest of all the Macaws.
by Terry Costales
(47 of 189) Four turtles sunned themselves just across the pond in the weak afternoon sunshine.
by Terry Costales
(48 of 189) A Western Squirrel scavenging on the ground, glimpsed through the foliage. A nice sun-dappled look.
by Terry Costales
(49 of 189) A tiny bronze hummingbird stopped to pose on the tip of a branch and I thanked him.
Yucca (513 views)
by Terry Costales
(50 of 189) This dramatically spiny yucca plant was found just inside the gate.
Forster Tern (524 views)
by Terry Costales
(51 of 189) A row of Forster Terns perched on the partial remains of a sunken ship.
by Terry Costales
(52 of 189) After the boat trip on Elkhorn Slough, we stopped by nearby Moss Landing State Beach and saw this marvelous Great Blue Heron. It may have been a member of the breeding colony we saw from the
by Terry Costales
(53 of 189) This photo shows a chickadee that had gathered some fuzzy material for its nest. Chickadees are quite active birds who don't usually pose as nicely as this one did for me. It actually held still for
by Terry Costales
(54 of 189) We encountered a pod of Bottlenose Dolphins on our return from a cruise around part of Anacapa Island in the Santa Barbara Channel . Some were leaping ahead and to the side of us while others raced
by Terry Costales
(55 of 189) Pelicans sunned themselves high atop a large rock cliff.
by Terry Costales
(56 of 189) The Island Fox is only found on the Santa Barbara Channel Islands. Each of those six islands has its own subspecies of this little fox. Very Galapagos of them.
by Terry Costales
(57 of 189) A lone individual popped up out of the water after a dive for food. We suspected he has a clam grasped in his paws. Otters love shellfish.
by Terry Costales
(58 of 189) A cold November day didn't keep this foolish man out of the water, but it made a nice photo.
by Terry Costales
(59 of 189) This cormorant scooped up a beakful of water plants to build its nest and then flew off.
Kite (596 views)
by Terry Costales
(60 of 189) The human animal attached to this kite is on his board offscreen and hanging on for dear life.
by Terry Costales
(61 of 189) Several energetic hornbills rarely stopped their rapid walk around the giraffe enclosure.
by Terry Costales
(62 of 189) A shell was almost the size of the otter's head, but was no match for its appetite.
by Terry Costales
(63 of 189) Close up of a male sea lion. According to Wiki, "Zalophus californianus" means "Californian big-head" because a male grows a crest of bone on top of his head that causes a bulging forehead.
by Terry Costales
(64 of 189) It surprises me that a big bird like a Pelican can fly so effortlessly.
by Terry Costales
(65 of 189) I believe we San Franciscans should campaign for better dental care for Our squirrels. Maybe we can get it on the next ballot.
by Terry Costales
(66 of 189) It was beautiful day in Santa Cruz and I had been photographing the sea lions when this pelican landed a few feet away on the pier railing. If there was ever a compelling visual argument for birds
by Terry Costales
(67 of 189) Towhees are the robin-sized birds that scoot away under shrubbery before you can get a close look at them. Unless you are a bird stalker (I mean photographer) with much patience.
by Terry Costales
(68 of 189) A male mallard posed on a large tree limb that extended out over the water. The sunlight made his iridescent colors show well.
by Terry Costales
(69 of 189) Is the Stellar's Jay a blue bird with a charcoal top or a charcoal bird with a blue bottom?
by Terry Costales
(70 of 189) This photo of a Brandt's Cormorant preening shows the decorative white plumes they acquire during the breeding season.
by Terry Costales
(71 of 189) Close to Anacapa there were scores of seabirds and the light was lovely.
Anna's Hummingbird (1022 views)
by Terry Costales
(72 of 189) A close-up of the hummingbird I posted yesterday.
by Terry Costales
(73 of 189) The King of the Jungle appeared regal that day.
by Terry Costales
(74 of 189) A cliff of cormorants.
by Terry Costales
(75 of 189) A handsome male blackbird perched on a branch.
by Terry Costales
(76 of 189) Also known as the white-handed gibbon, this Lar Gibbon lazed in the afternoon sun. These gibbons have colorings that range from black to white with all shades of brown in between.
by Terry Costales
(77 of 189) Bewick is pronounced Buick, like the car. This wren is thriving in the nation's parklands and adds its voice to nature's concert.
Anna's Hummingbird (614 views)
by Terry Costales
(78 of 189) A male Anna's hummingbird perches on Neptunes' trident. I was surprised to see a hummingbird stay still for so long.
by Terry Costales
(79 of 189) As we headed to the car I captured this last glimpse of an Oregon Junco just before he disappeared over the rooftop.
by Terry Costales
(80 of 189) A snowy egret in flight is the poetry of nature.
by Terry Costales
(81 of 189) Catching the afternoon sun, the master of the grasses rests in its domain.
Bumblebee (535 views)
by Terry Costales
(82 of 189) I have always wanted to photograph a bumblebee with flowers and this was my lucky day. My camera and lens together weighed about five pounds and I had been out for a couple of hours before I came
by Terry Costales
(83 of 189) This photo of a Whimbrel flying illustrates the unique shape of its bill.
by Terry Costales
(84 of 189) This is a female yellow-hooded blackbird. Her body is brown, whereas the male would be glossy black.
by Terry Costales
(85 of 189) A handsome Double-crested Cormorant posed on a mossy rock for the photographer.
by Terry Costales
(86 of 189) A cliff swallow sits in the opening of its mud nest. Observing me observing him.
by Terry Costales
(87 of 189) Sea Lions swam in and out of sunlight and shade beneath the wharf in Santa Cruz.
by Terry Costales
(88 of 189) A closer look at pelicans on the cliff face.
by Terry Costales
(89 of 189) A very large, old Leopard Tortoise sunned itself that afternoon.
by Terry Costales
(90 of 189) A very large tortoise with an imposing look.
by Terry Costales
(91 of 189) Western Pond Turtles sunned themselves on a log in Jewel Lake. The leading turtle on the log however was a Red Slider. Perhaps a pet released after the owners became bored with it or the turtle
by Terry Costales
(92 of 189) The loons that day seemed to stay well away from our boat. I was only able to get close enough for this one photo. This is a Common Loon in winter plumage.
by Terry Costales
(93 of 189) For an unforgettable wildlife experience, I highly recommend the Elkhorn Slough Safari in Moss Landing. We saw over one hundred sea otters, almost eighty harbor seals and dozens of sea lions very
by Terry Costales
(94 of 189) Gray Squirrels seem to be thriving in the Arboretum. We saw about a dozen that afternoon.
by Terry Costales
(95 of 189) This is one otter trying to persuade another otter to share its meal. It wasn't very successful.
by Terry Costales
(96 of 189) A meerkat taking his turn as sentry.
by Terry Costales
(97 of 189) Towhees are not often seen in trees, because they love to forage in leaf litter under bushes and at the edges of paths.
by Terry Costales
(98 of 189) Wilson's Warblers are numerous in California, yet this was the first one I had ever seen. Of course, since seeing my first, I now suddenly seem to find them on every outing.
by Terry Costales
(99 of 189) The Wilson's Warbler from yesterdays posting, viewed from a different angle, showed that it had been banded. The silver band was numbered and was issued by US Fish & Wildlife, the colored bands had
by Terry Costales
(100 of 189) This is a juvenile Yellow-headed Caracara. Like most juvenile birds it has lots of streaking to give it more camouflage than the adult.
by Terry Costales
(101 of 189) Two Phoebes were very active near Jewel Lake's shore. This nesting pair would each catch insects, pose on the spillway and then fly to feed their nesting young.
by Terry Costales
(102 of 189) This Capybara needs a good brushing.
by Terry Costales
(103 of 189) As we left that day we passed a nice pond with water lilies. A gorgeous flower but without the iconic frog.
by Terry Costales
(104 of 189) Two Harbor Seal were of quite different fur colors but all the whiskers were blonde.
by Terry Costales
(105 of 189) The improbable flamingo pondering its place in natural history.
by Terry Costales
(106 of 189) After a dive this Pelagic Cormorant surfaced much too close to the boat and immediately swam away. This photo captured its startled look.
by Terry Costales
(107 of 189) A Pelican and Snowy Egret perched on the edge of an old vessel. The frayed ropes added a colorful touch.
by Terry Costales
(108 of 189) Brandt's cormorants were the most numerous of the three species of cormorants seen that day. The slender white plumes on its face and the blue patch on its throat only appear during breeding season.
by Terry Costales
(109 of 189) A vulture sits atop the ribcage of a rotting animal carcass on the beach. Offering disgust and fascination in equal measure.
by Terry Costales
(110 of 189) I almost didn't see this well camouflaged and slow moving slug. He and I are both happy I didn't step on him. The Banana Slug is also famous for its role in sports. It is the official mascot of
by Terry Costales
(111 of 189) A Scrub Jay in a tree with a very large bug!
by Terry Costales
(112 of 189) Looking at this crow's feet you can really see the dinosaur common ancestor. I'm grateful most birds are small as I wouldn't want to try to photograph a crow the size of a T-rex.
by Terry Costales
(113 of 189) This is a photo of what appears to be a male Monarch butterfly. Male because it has two extra dots on its back wings that produce pheromones. Another obscure fact I learned from Wikipedia.
by Terry Costales
(114 of 189) Harbor seals are close to the top of the cute list, right up there next to sea otters. We saw close to eighty harbor seals that day, most of them lying on shore watching us watching them.
Song Sparrow (663 views)
by Terry Costales
(115 of 189) A song sparrow foraging in the wetlands. A tiny, delicate, feathered, everyday miracle.
by Terry Costales
(116 of 189) A bird with young to feed has a full time job and in this case a very full beak.
by Terry Costales
(117 of 189) More of the endless variation of facial expressions you can always find in sea lions.
Blue Damselfly (597 views)
by Terry Costales
(118 of 189) These conjoined damselflies are a mated pair and stay connected like this until the eggs are laid. Both damselflies seen here are bright blue so this may be a "gay" pairing as documented in National
by Terry Costales
(119 of 189) Pretty, noisy and never stays still for long. That's the chickadee.
by Terry Costales
(120 of 189) A small harem of sea lions on their private island.
by Terry Costales
(121 of 189) A flock of yellow-hooded blackbirds took off as our skiff came too near. The birds in the photo that are deep black were the males and the brown ones were the females.
by Terry Costales
(122 of 189) Here is a view of a pelican you don't usually see. A head on view of its enormous bill.
by Terry Costales
(123 of 189) An adult night heron in full breeding plumage showing off its pink legs which are yellow the rest of the year.
by Terry Costales
(124 of 189) The Santa Barbara zoo called this giraffe a Baringo giraffe. It was originally named the Rothschild giraffe and now sometimes called the Ugandan giraffe. No matter its name, it is a threatened
by Terry Costales
(125 of 189) A flock of pelicans flying in typical formation with Anacapa island in the background.
by Terry Costales
(126 of 189) The white plumes that appear during the breeding season are easily seen in this photo of the Brandt's cormorant.
by Terry Costales
(127 of 189) These two pelicans were one pair of dozens loitering around the marina, all waiting for a fishy opportunity. The one on the left was an immature bird which had not grown into its adult plumage.
by Terry Costales
(128 of 189) I know they are wild animals with big teeth and claws but jeez, don't they look cuddly?!
by Terry Costales
(129 of 189) A Red-tailed hawk perched on the keeper's arm.
by Terry Costales
(130 of 189) As we left Jewel Lake we were escorted out by a loud scolding Stellar's Jay. He was quite insistent that we had overstayed our welcome.
by Terry Costales
(131 of 189) A Marbled Godwit stood on the shore of the slough and displayed its classy black legs.
by Terry Costales
(132 of 189) A snowy egret mid landing appeared to dance.
Riley (616 views)
by Terry Costales
(133 of 189) Riley is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. A huge name for a wonderful little dog. The King Charles Spaniel (non-Cavalier) is smaller and has a much flatter or more pug-like face. In the '20s the
by Terry Costales
(134 of 189) Having escaped from a collection somewhere this Flamingo showed up in Elkhorn Slough in January. It was tagged but no-one has claimed it yet. I had previously seen this type of Flamingo in zoos
by Terry Costales
(135 of 189) These sea lions looked great on the rocks next to the opening of a sea cave.
by Terry Costales
(136 of 189) A loud, large, parrot looking quite handsome.
by Terry Costales
(137 of 189) Here is an older otter, recognized by the light colored fur on its face. It is grooming itself after eating. Otters must have one of the cutest faces in the animal kingdom
by Terry Costales
(138 of 189) A capybara peeking coyly from behind its giant palm frond.
by Terry Costales
(139 of 189) Phoebes are one of my favorite birds because they seem so positive about life. I know I embue them with that attitude, but it's what I see. Shown here is a Phoebe perched on a gate.
by Terry Costales
(140 of 189) A Red-shouldered Hawk showed off his very red shoulders while atop a high voltage power pole.
by Terry Costales
(141 of 189) A Black Phoebe about to deliver lunch to it's young.
by Terry Costales
(142 of 189) This black phoebe is dark brown and was perched near the Palo Alto duck pond. Phoebes are almost always found near water.
by Terry Costales
(143 of 189) Here is the lesser flamingo which hung out near the cormorants in the Elkhorn Slough. I hope the flamingo is still there and thriving.
by Terry Costales
(144 of 189) The larger Great Egret was stalked by the smaller Snowy Egret.
by Terry Costales
(145 of 189) I just love it when a bird comes close enough and holds still enough to get a good shot like this!
by Terry Costales
(146 of 189) Portrait of a large male sea lion sleepily surveying his domain.
by Terry Costales
(147 of 189) In this photo you can easily see the differences between the adult and the juvenile cormorant. The glossy black bird with prominent "eyebrows" is an adult in breeding plumage.
by Terry Costales
(148 of 189) Skeletal ship ribs now supported a row of windswept terns.
by Terry Costales
(149 of 189) Here is a Western Grebe ready to dive for fish.
by Terry Costales
(150 of 189) A very large male sea lion with a much smaller female.
by Terry Costales
(151 of 189) A solitary pond turtle suns itself on a log.
by Terry Costales
(152 of 189) This group shot of harbor seals illustrates their cuteness and wide variations in colors.
by Terry Costales
(153 of 189) The coot is a common bird found just about everywhere there is fresh water. The coot is not a duck but a rail. It doesn't have the typical flat bill of a duck and its feet are quite different,
by Terry Costales
(154 of 189) A cormorant was about to remove a leaf that had fallen onto its back.
by Terry Costales
(155 of 189) This killdeer tried to lure me away from her nest and eggs fluttering her wings as if injured. Ironically, the only reason I knew her nest was nearby was because of the mother killdeer's behavior.
Crayfish (539 views)
by Terry Costales
(156 of 189) A crayfish was unexpectedly sighted in the Botanical Gardens. When I was a kid we called it a crawdad.
by Terry Costales
(157 of 189) A scrub jay in a tree on a cold overcast day in November.
by Terry Costales
(158 of 189) This Red-tailed hawk was being trained that afternoon. He flew down to gobble a tossed tidbit and then contemplated his flight back up to the keepers arm.
by Terry Costales
(159 of 189) Bette Davis eyes? Bedroom eyes? Puppy dog eyes? They've got nothing on harbor seal eyes! The little slit behind the eye is the ear which is an easy way to distinguish it from a sea lion with its
by Terry Costales
(160 of 189) This male goldfinch was in transitional plumage, moving from non-breeding into breeding colors. He also appeared to be molting a bit, as goldfinches do twice a year.