Animalblog for June 07, 2010 (3 of 189) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
20100607_Western_Grebe_Ready_To_Dive.jpg
Animalblog for June 07, 2010 (3 of 189) <<-first last->> slideshow <-previous next->
Western Grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis) (538 views)
Elkhorn Slough, Moss Landing, California
(Photo posted Monday 7 June, 2010)

(Photo taken 09:44:14 Friday 12 March, 2010)

© 2010 Terry Costales
Creative Commons License

Here is a Western Grebe ready to dive for fish. external link

Some Related Stories: 2008 ° 2012 ° 2014 ° 2011 ° 2007
by Terry Costales
(4 of 189) A female avocet sits on her eggs. When the tide comes in this nest will barely be above the water.
by Terry Costales
(5 of 189) After "evicting" us from its part of the park, the jay watched and made sure we were actually leaving.
by Terry Costales
(6 of 189) A meerkat taking his turn as sentry.
by Terry Costales
(7 of 189) This wall of pelicans was only a small sampling of the hundreds on the island.
Killdeer eggs (842 views)
by Terry Costales
(8 of 189) This was the second killdeer nest I'd found. The first one was on gravel and this one on flowerbed mulch. Both times the nests were easily overlooked and the eggs hard to spot.
by Terry Costales
(9 of 189) Sea Otters appeared to spend a great deal of their time grooming themselves. They use their bodies as tables, so have to keep food scraps washed off. While they clean, they also push and sometimes
by Terry Costales
(10 of 189) This male goldfinch was in transitional plumage, moving from non-breeding into breeding colors. He also appeared to be molting a bit, as goldfinches do twice a year.
by Terry Costales
(11 of 189) A Scrub Jay on a barbecue searched for food.
by Terry Costales
(12 of 189) Also known as the white-handed gibbon, this Lar Gibbon lazed in the afternoon sun. These gibbons have colorings that range from black to white with all shades of brown in between.
by Terry Costales
(13 of 189) This cormorant appeared to swim in green water but the green was actually a reflection of trees.
by Terry Costales
(14 of 189) A Red-shouldered Hawk showed off his very red shoulders while atop a high voltage power pole.
by Terry Costales
(15 of 189) A Pelican and Snowy Egret perched on the edge of an old vessel. The frayed ropes added a colorful touch.
Bumblebee (531 views)
by Terry Costales
(16 of 189) I have always wanted to photograph a bumblebee with flowers and this was my lucky day. My camera and lens together weighed about five pounds and I had been out for a couple of hours before I came
by Terry Costales
(17 of 189) This photo shows a chickadee that had gathered some fuzzy material for its nest. Chickadees are quite active birds who don't usually pose as nicely as this one did for me. It actually held still for
Yucca (508 views)
by Terry Costales
(18 of 189) This dramatically spiny yucca plant was found just inside the gate.
by Terry Costales
(19 of 189) A very pregnant Harbor Seal looking quite pleased with herself.
by Terry Costales
(20 of 189) This is a female yellow-hooded blackbird. Her body is brown, whereas the male would be glossy black.
by Terry Costales
(21 of 189) The sandpipers illustrate the adage that "birds of a feather flock together" and the whimbrel shows that, yes, we all can just get along.
by Terry Costales
(22 of 189) The typical Towhee is very shy and will scuttle away as soon as anyone approaches. This Towhee however, allowed me to get quite close and seemed unpreturbed by me or other visitors to the park.
by Terry Costales
(23 of 189) This Capybara needs a good brushing.
by Terry Costales
(24 of 189) It surprises me that a big bird like a Pelican can fly so effortlessly.
by Terry Costales
(25 of 189) Wilson's Warblers are numerous in California, yet this was the first one I had ever seen. Of course, since seeing my first, I now suddenly seem to find them on every outing.
by Terry Costales
(26 of 189) A large group of pelicans were perched on the fish processing equipment.
by Terry Costales
(27 of 189) Pretty, noisy and never stays still for long. That's the chickadee.
Kite (590 views)
by Terry Costales
(28 of 189) The human animal attached to this kite is on his board offscreen and hanging on for dear life.
by Terry Costales
(29 of 189) A handsome Double-crested Cormorant posed on a mossy rock for the photographer.
by Terry Costales
(30 of 189) Usually, a spotted towhee is seen in the underbrush. In the spring however, the male spends a great deal of time in the trees singing to attract a mate.
by Terry Costales
(31 of 189) These sea lions looked great on the rocks next to the opening of a sea cave.
by Terry Costales
(32 of 189) A snowy egret in flight is the poetry of nature.
by Terry Costales
(33 of 189) Is the Stellar's Jay a blue bird with a charcoal top or a charcoal bird with a blue bottom?
by Terry Costales
(34 of 189) I saw many lizards that day. This one was recharging his "solar batteries". When I was a kid we called this type of lizard a blue-belly.
by Terry Costales
(35 of 189) A Great Blue Heron waded in shallow water in search of food.
by Terry Costales
(36 of 189) As we left Jewel Lake we were escorted out by a loud scolding Stellar's Jay. He was quite insistent that we had overstayed our welcome.
Crayfish (533 views)
by Terry Costales
(37 of 189) A crayfish was unexpectedly sighted in the Botanical Gardens. When I was a kid we called it a crawdad.
Macaws (672 views)
by Terry Costales
(38 of 189) Two Macaws preening one another. A very intimate, gentle moment in a birds' life.
by Terry Costales
(39 of 189) This is a photo of what appears to be a male Monarch butterfly. Male because it has two extra dots on its back wings that produce pheromones. Another obscure fact I learned from Wikipedia.
by Terry Costales
(40 of 189) Looking at this crow's feet you can really see the dinosaur common ancestor. I'm grateful most birds are small as I wouldn't want to try to photograph a crow the size of a T-rex.
by Terry Costales
(41 of 189) The lion demonstrated camouflage.
by Terry Costales
(42 of 189) Pelicans sunned themselves high atop a large rock cliff.
by Terry Costales
(43 of 189) More of the endless variation of facial expressions you can always find in sea lions.
by Terry Costales
(44 of 189) A female sea lion tried to appear very demure.
by Terry Costales
(45 of 189) This cormorant scooped up a beakful of water plants to build its nest and then flew off.
by Terry Costales
(46 of 189) This bedraggled juvenile black-crowned night heron was perched on the dock near the boat we were going to use. I hoped it wasn't a harbinger of how our trip would turn out.
by Terry Costales
(47 of 189) A loud, large, parrot looking quite handsome.
by Terry Costales
(48 of 189) For an unforgettable wildlife experience, I highly recommend the Elkhorn Slough Safari in Moss Landing. We saw over one hundred sea otters, almost eighty harbor seals and dozens of sea lions very
by Terry Costales
(49 of 189) A cold November day didn't keep this foolish man out of the water, but it made a nice photo.
by Terry Costales
(50 of 189) The King of the Jungle appeared regal that day.
by Terry Costales
(51 of 189) A male mallard posed on a large tree limb that extended out over the water. The sunlight made his iridescent colors show well.
by Terry Costales
(52 of 189) A Red-tailed hawk perched on the keeper's arm.
by Terry Costales
(53 of 189) The same type of lizard I saw on Sherman Island was found in Tilden Park.
by Terry Costales
(54 of 189) This photo of a Brandt's Cormorant preening shows the decorative white plumes they acquire during the breeding season.
David Graves (742 views)
by Terry Costales
(55 of 189) My dashing brother manned the wheel of the Tourmalina. However, he is a man of many talents and helped out in other ways as well.
by Terry Costales
(56 of 189) As we headed to the car I captured this last glimpse of an Oregon Junco just before he disappeared over the rooftop.
by Terry Costales
(57 of 189) Two Harbor Seal were of quite different fur colors but all the whiskers were blonde.
by Terry Costales
(58 of 189) Natural Bridges Park was sunny and bright that day, which brought out the colors of the birds and water. In contrast, he following day was overcast with afternoon rain.
by Terry Costales
(59 of 189) Seeing a large colony of sea lions in the wild is very different than seeing them in a manmade setting like Pier 39.
by Terry Costales
(60 of 189) Having escaped from a collection somewhere this Flamingo showed up in Elkhorn Slough in January. It was tagged but no-one has claimed it yet. I had previously seen this type of Flamingo in zoos
by Terry Costales
(61 of 189) I grew up to know this bird as the Oregon Junco with it's rufous flanks and black hood. Then I later learned it is really a Dark-eyed Junco and the Oregon Junco is a subspecies. This species of
by Terry Costales
(62 of 189) This Pacific-slope Flycatcher sat on its thorny branch and let me approach to within a few feet. It was perched in the trees surrounding the now closed Pony Rides at Tilden Park.
by Terry Costales
(63 of 189) The Wilson's Warbler from yesterdays posting, viewed from a different angle, showed that it had been banded. The silver band was numbered and was issued by US Fish & Wildlife, the colored bands had
Fern (665 views)
by Terry Costales
(64 of 189) This was neither a talon nor a mutated squid tentacle. It was the just the frond of a fern about to unroll. The actual plant was at least seven feet tall.
by Terry Costales
(65 of 189) A Scrub Jay in a tree with a very large bug!
by Terry Costales
(66 of 189) A snowy egret mid landing appeared to dance.
by Terry Costales
(67 of 189) The Island Fox is only found on the Santa Barbara Channel Islands. Each of those six islands has its own subspecies of this little fox. Very Galapagos of them.
by Terry Costales
(68 of 189) The Green-winged Macaw goes by many names: Greenwing Macaw, Red and Green Macaw and Green Wing Macaw. They are one of the largest and gentlest of all the Macaws.
by Terry Costales
(69 of 189) A Western Grebe after its dive for fish.
by Terry Costales
(70 of 189) A very large tortoise with an imposing look.
by Terry Costales
(71 of 189) This Stellar's Jay held down a butterfly and pulled off it's wing's. Naughty bird.
by Terry Costales
(72 of 189) Here is the escaped flamingo of Elkhorn Slough. I realize it's the look of this species of flamingo, but doesn't this guy appear as if he's totally fed up with his job and can't take it anymore?
by Terry Costales
(73 of 189) A male American Goldfinch coming into breeding plumage.
by Terry Costales
(74 of 189) This black phoebe is dark brown and was perched near the Palo Alto duck pond. Phoebes are almost always found near water.
by Terry Costales
(75 of 189) These two pelicans were one pair of dozens loitering around the marina, all waiting for a fishy opportunity. The one on the left was an immature bird which had not grown into its adult plumage.
by Terry Costales
(76 of 189) I believe we San Franciscans should campaign for better dental care for Our squirrels. Maybe we can get it on the next ballot.
by Terry Costales
(77 of 189) A flock of pelicans flying in typical formation with Anacapa island in the background.
by Terry Costales
(78 of 189) A very common bird but one I've rarely photographed. The red color of this house finch indicated he was male. The female, by contrast, is quite plain with no coloration.
by Terry Costales
(79 of 189) The Santa Barbara zoo called this giraffe a Baringo giraffe. It was originally named the Rothschild giraffe and now sometimes called the Ugandan giraffe. No matter its name, it is a threatened
by Terry Costales
(80 of 189) The otter balanced his "plate" on his stomach while enjoying that last little morsel.
by Terry Costales
(81 of 189) The Spectacled Bear is the only bear that comes from South America. I hope this unique and beautiful endangered bear survives.